Researchers looking for the potential biochemical basis for this link have focused on acetaldehyde.

Alcoholic beverages linked to an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal cancer Drinking alcoholic beverages has been linked to an increased risk of upper gastrointestinal cancers and other types of cancer. Researchers looking for the potential biochemical basis for this link have focused on acetaldehyde, a suspected carcinogen shaped as the physical body metabolizes alcohol. In the journal Nucleic Acids Analysis, researchers from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the National Institute of Standards and Technology record that polyamines – natural compounds essential for cell growth – react with acetaldehyde to result in a number of reactions that harm DNA, an event that can result in the formation of cancer pde5 inhibitors .

At Loyola, about 50 faculty members, technicians, post-doctoral students and fellows are conducting alcohol research. Research at Loyola and various other centers could lead to therapies to boost the immune system or otherwise minimize the effects of alcohol, stated Elizabeth J. Kovacs, PhD, director of Loyola’s Alcohol Research System and associate director of Loyola’s Burn off & Shock Trauma Institute. ‘Of course, the easiest method to prevent the damaging effects of alcohol is to not drink to begin with,’ Kovacs said. ‘Nonetheless it is very difficult to get visitors to do this.’ Sessions at the conference include Alcohol and Disease, Alcohol and Oxidative Tension and Alcohol and Organ Inflammation.